How do I find a group for DND and other TTRPGs? — 5 great tools


I love TTRPGs, but they’re pretty hard to break into, especially if you don’t already have a group of friends interested in learning how to play. Luckily, I was lucky enough to have a group that was willing to learn, but I also caught a few interweb players and groups using some fun tools, and you can too. Do not worry; I will review everything. As someone struggling with anxiety and depression — a combo that’s not ideal for a reporter or game master juggling seven different players in a six-hour Dungeons & Dragons game — it can be difficult to open up to a whole new group of people let alone find them.

In this week’s tabletop advice column from an anxious GM (all of which can be found on our DND Advice hub), I’ll provide five tools or resources you can use to find a band to play with. This was inspired by a recent message I received from someone asking to join my own group – I was incredibly flattered, but unfortunately I’m full of players. So it’s for that person, and others like them who want to find a group.

It’s not as simple as messaging random people or offering your Discord username when it suits you – it certainly can be, but it’s not always the case. In some places, you’ll even have to submit applications (yes, I’m serious). Let me explain.

TL; DR

There are five tools you can use. D&D beyond. To find groups or players in D&D Beyond, go to Forums > Search for players and groups. Roll20. You’ll want to jump to the Join a game after creating an account, then refine your searches to find what you are looking for. Table helper. You can look through the list of available gamesand all you have to do is click “ask to join”. Start playing. Pay money for a professional game in the find games listing. To meet. Check Dungeons & Dragons topic (opens in a new tab) or even the Subject Role-playing games and tabletop board games (opens in a new tab) to search through local events or groups.

How to find a group for DND and other TTRPGs – an in-depth review

How do I find a group for DND and other TTRPGs?  — 5 great tools

(Image credit: Wizards)

D&D beyond. This is primarily for those looking for a D&D 5e group, but D&D Beyond is one of my favorite sites for finding players and groups. I created a whole D&D group for my wife and I in D&D Beyond just to give her a try, and now she has four new best friends.

To find groups or players in D&D Beyond, go to Forums > Search for players and groups. You can either start your own thread and write a bit about yourself and what you’re looking for, or browse the latest posts and comment on the ones that interest you. It shouldn’t take you long at all to find a game, but it might take you a little while to find the right game for you. On these forums, they usually prioritize preferences such as game, preferred group, experience, time zone, availability, preferred role, and playstyle.

Roll20. I’m not a huge fan of Roll20, or its search for band lists, but I’m going to mention it because it’s popular. You’re not necessarily advertising yourself or looking for a band, but rather a game. Unlike D&D Beyond, Roll20 covers a wide range of TTRPGs, including Call of Cthulhu, Vampire: The Masquerade, and Mutant: Year Zero.

You’ll want to jump to the Join a game after creating an account, then refine your searches to find what you are looking for. Typically, you’ll need to post a new thread in the game you’re interested in, or you’ll need to comment on an existing thread. There are usually tons of views and comments, but don’t let that put you off! You will need to “apply” to one of these games using the creator format – be sure to include your contact information (something not too private).

How do I find a group for DND and other TTRPGs?  — 5 great tools

(Image credit: Wizards)

Table helper. This is a fun new tool specially designed to find groups unlike previous tools. You can create an account, set your location, time zone, language, experience, preferences, etc. Then you look through the list of available gamesand all you have to do is click “ask to join”.

There aren’t too many games available that I found, but once you request to join you can choose your preferred role in some cases and then introduce yourself. It’s a bit like writing a cover letter for a job. Yes, it’s hard work, but so is socializing, and that’s how you start, so don’t be discouraged and give it a try!

Start playing. It’s less for those looking for a band and more for those looking for a professionally run TTRPG. The main difference between StartPlaying and other sites is that it is not free. Games start at $5 and can go up to $50. This is a great opportunity for those new to a certain TTRPG and need a guide, or even those looking for a more serious game.

You don’t have to pay any money to find a good group of TTRPGers, but if you go this route, you’ll go through the find games list and request membership by entering your credit card information. You won’t be charged until the session starts, but you’re essentially paying for a seat to play at one of these tables.

How do I find a group for DND and other TTRPGs?  — 5 great tools

(Image credit: Wizards)

To meet. This is a tool for finding events of all kinds, not just TTRPG related, but if you want to join an in-person session, this might work for you. You’ll need to do some legwork by creating an account and finding a local group that participates in the specific game you’re interested in.

You can also always create your own event through this, and it would be a great way to build an in-person group. Check Dungeons & Dragons topic (opens in a new tab) or even the Subject Role-playing games and tabletop board games (opens in a new tab) to search through events or groups. If you live in a more populated area, it will be much easier to use. But if you can’t find a group near you, I strongly encourage you to start your own.

How do I find a group for DND and other TTRPGs?  — 5 great tools

(Image credit: Wizards)

Hope this helps new players and GMs getting into TTRPGs. If you enjoyed this column and would like to see it continue, you can send me your own questions regarding mechanical, narrative, or social issues in the tabletop gaming space. You can email me at [email protected] or find me on Twitter.

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